VISA TYPES

Unless you are a Korean Citizen, you will need a visa to teach in South Korea.  Here are the common visa classifications for expat teachers:

E2 Visa:  This is the standard visa for expat teachers.  The duration of the visa is up to one year, and requires employer sponsorship.  Generally, an E2 visa can be renewed easily without resubmitting documentation, but this requires the cooperation of your employee sponsor.  Required documents: valid passport, clean nationwide criminal background check with apostille, copy of diploma from acredited four-year college or university with apostille, proof of offer of employment in Korea (usually, a contract), self-health check, applicant information form

D10 Visa:  This is a visa for job seekers.     Under this visa, you are not permitted to work but you may remain in Korea for up to six months and seek employment.  Also, when you find a job, you’ll be able to transfer to another visa classification (like E2) more easily than you would under a tourist visa (which would involve a visa run to another country).

F2 Visa:  This visa is for ethnic Koreans (Kyopos).  If you’re eligible, we recommend it, since it will allow you to stay in Korea for up to two years, does not need to be amended or transferred if you switch jobs, and allows you to legally tutor privately.  Some employers also give hiring preference to candidates with F2 visas.  An F2 visa must be renewed every two years, but this is a fairly easy procedure, and will not require you to resubmit documentation.  Required documents: proof that either you, your parents, or grandparents once held Korean citizenship and have officially renounced it.  

F6 Visa:  This visa is for spouses of Korean citizens.  If you’re eligible, we recommend it, since it will allow you to stay in Korea for up to two years, does not need to be amended or transferred if you switch jobs, and allows you to legally tutor privately.  Some employers also give hiring preference to candidates with F6 visas.  An F6 visa must be renewed every two years, but this is a fairly easy procedure, and will not require you to resubmit documentation.  Required documents: proof of marriage to a Korean citizen, the cooperation of your spouse, demonstrated proof that you can communicate with your spouse (either you speak Korean or your spouse speaks English), a combined income of roughly $20,000/year, and (if it’s your first time applying for a visa in Korea) all the documents required for an E2 visa except for the diploma.

One Response to VISA TYPES

  1. AMMENDMENT: It’s been brought to our attention that F-class visas do not actually allow you to legally tutor privately. Under an F-class visa, you will have the same employment rights as a Korean citizen. However, even if you are a Korean citizen, you technically need a license to tutor privately. It’s mostly a tax issue. Nevertheless, this law is very rarely enforced, and most F-class visa holders that we know tutor privately without fear. And, in the very unlikely case that you are reported, the maximum penalty would be a fine, whereas under an E-2 visa, you would likely face deportation.

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